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SaturnOppVenJup
Saturn and the Sibley Chart, 2018

I’ve written several times on the Sibley chart for the United States. This is a horoscope drawn by Ebenezer Sibley for the day that the Declaration of Independence was signed. We don’t know where Sibley got the time for this chart. He was in Paris, France on July 4, 1776 and never set foot on this side of the Atlantic. However, the horoscope checks out pretty well when matched against important events in U.S. history and has become the most commonly used chart for the United States. (Click here for more information on the Sibley Chart.)


We saw an example of how the Sibley chart can work last summer. At the time transiting Saturn was opposed to Mars in the Sibley chart. Saturn represents many things, but in mundane astrology (the astrology of current events) it often acts like a big stop sign. Meanwhile, Mars in the horoscope of an entity like a nation represents actions and initiatives. When we look back at when this aspect occurred previously in American history we find periods of stalemate, in which actions by the government or a government agency were blocked and frustrated.


So, what happened last summer? The U.S. Senate tried repeatedly to repeal and replace, and finally just repeal Obamacare and failed every time. This happened despite the fact that Republican’s held a majority in the Senate. Public outcry and the defection of a few key Republican Senators continually blocked this effort by a government agency to exert its will.


Of course, aspects pass. Saturn was retrograde at the beginning of last summer. It stationed (stopped it apparent backwards movement relative to the Earth) and then began to move forward in the sky again. By the beginning of December the planet was moving quickly through the last few degrees of Sagittarius toward Capricorn. With the opposition to the Sibley Mars no longer in effect, Congress managed to pass a major tax overhaul and a temporary budget.


So what’s next for Saturn and the Sibley Chart? This week Saturn moved into Capricorn and it will soon form an opposition aspect with both Venus and Jupiter in the Sibley U.S. horoscope. In mundane astrology Venus is typically associated with money, while Jupiter represents the law and the philosophical basis for the law. Previous oppositions between Saturn and the Sibley Venus and Jupiter have brought us major legislation relating to economy. The last square aspect between Saturn and these two planets occurred just before the Dodd-Frank Act was passed.


The Dodd-Frank Act was a reaction to the economic collapse of 2008. It placed restrictions on how banks could loan money and regulations on financial institutions. The bill has always been controversial. Republicans say that it has strangled economic growth. In June, 2017 the House passed a bill that would have ended Dodd-Frank but it failed in the Senate. (Saturn oppose Mars strikes again.) Recently, another bill to overturn Dodd-Frank has been proposed in the Senate.


Saturn will oppose the Sibley Venus and Jupiter in Jan-Feb, June-July, and Oct-Nov. 2018. With this in mind, it is interesting that President Trump may not sign the Republican tax plan until January. Beyond that, I think that we can expect to see further efforts by Congress to eliminated Dodd-Frank entirely and return the financial industry to the free-wheeling days of the 1990s and early 2000s.


2017 was a year of drama. The Senate’s attempt to repeal Obamacare was American’s favorite TV reality show last summer. Next year’s aspect by Saturn is not going to be nearly exciting. It’s going to all about economic theory and GNP, boring stuff that most of us will not want to hear about. But that doesn’t mean it won’t be important, or that five years from now we won’t be wondering what happened as the bank forecloses on our house.

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